"Each friend represents a world in us, a world possibly not born until they arrive." Anaïs Nin


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Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Nice Signed Interpretation of "Unwritten" by the Harp Twins

These girls are just a lot of fun to watch. Fabulous Husband loves their harp music, I love their signed videos.






No captions, but here are the lyrics:  Unwritten by Natasha Bedingfield


NATASHA BEDINGFIELD LYRICS
Unwritten Ringtone  Unwritten Ringtone 


"Unwritten"

I am unwritten, can't read my mind, I'm undefined
I'm just beginning, the pen's in my hand, ending unplanned

Staring at the blank page before you
Open up the dirty window
Let the sun illuminate the words that you could not find

Reaching for something in the distance
So close you can almost taste it
Release your inhibitions
Feel the rain on your skin
No one else can feel it for you
Only you can let it in
No one else, no one else
Can speak the words on your lips
Drench yourself in words unspoken
Live your life with arms wide open
Today is where your book begins
The rest is still unwritten

Oh, oh, oh

I break tradition, sometimes my tries, are outside the lines
We've been conditioned to not make mistakes, but I can't live that way

Staring at the blank page before you
Open up the dirty window
Let the sun illuminate the words that you could not find

Reaching for something in the distance
So close you can almost taste it
Release your inhibitions
Feel the rain on your skin
No one else can feel it for you
Only you can let it in
No one else, no one else
Can speak the words on your lips
Drench yourself in words unspoken
Live your life with arms wide open
Today is where your book begins

Feel the rain on your skin
No one else can feel it for you
Only you can let it in
No one else, no one else
Can speak the words on your lips
Drench yourself in words unspoken
Live your life with arms wide open
Today is where your book begins
The rest is still unwritten

Staring at the blank page before you
Open up the dirty window
Let the sun illuminate the words that you could not find

Reaching for something in the distance
So close you can almost taste it
Release your inhibitions
Feel the rain on your skin
No one else can feel it for you
Only you can let it in
No one else, no one else
Can speak the words on your lips
Drench yourself in words unspoken
Live your life with arms wide open
Today is where your book begins

Feel the rain on your skin
No one else can feel it for you
Only you can let it in
No one else, no one else
Can speak the words on your lips
Drench yourself in words unspoken
Live your life with arms wide open
Today is where your book begins
The rest is still unwritten
The rest is still unwritten
The rest is still unwritten

Oh, yeah, yeah 


Thanks to cosmic_angel89 for adding these lyrics.Thanks to leo_da_lion88, NICEMAN1974, BREE, ngamewhiz, keh111 for correcting these lyrics.

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

I learned something new today

I found this information about Nystagmus today and I'm amazed at the numbers. I also wonder, how many people have ear and balance problems along WITH Nystagmus. I'm so glad I found this information, because the symptoms are exactly what I have been living with all these years, but been unable to explain or put into words myself. Now I wonder, how much of my symptoms are from ear problems, and how much from eye problems. I often have to read and reread things over again, because words get in the wrong place (I have rotary nystagmus, cirular movement). This explains so much why lip reading is so difficult as well. I wish I had known all of this when I was younger. The link to the blog I found this information is below the article.




About Nystagmus

Source of information RNIB
Nystagmus is an uncontrolled movement of the eyes, usually from side to side, but sometimes the eyes swing up and down or even in a circular movement. Most people with nystagmus have reduced vision.

Types of Nystagmus

Nystagmus that appears in the first months of life is called “early onset nystagmus” or “congenital nystagmus”. The condition may also develop later in life when the term “acquired nystagmus” is used.

Causes Nystagmus

Nystagmus in early childhood may be caused by a problem with the eye or visual pathway from the eye to the brain. It occurs in a wide range of eye conditions of childhood such as cataract, glaucoma, some conditions of the retina and albinism (see “Related eye conditions” later in this document). It may also be found in children who have multiple disabilities such as Down’s syndrome.
Many children with nystagmus do not have eye, brain or other health problems. In this case the condition is called “congenital idiopathic nystagmus” or “idiopathic nystagmus”, meaning that the condition starts very early on in life and the cause is unknown.
Several types of nystagmus can be inherited. To find out the chances of someone passing on nystagmus to the next generation, a specialist must first make an accurate diagnosis of the underlying condition. A clinical geneticist can provide detailed information. Your eye specialist will be able to refer you to one.
Acquired nystagmus, which develops later in life, may be a symptom of another condition such as stroke, multiple sclerosis or even a blow to the head. There are many causes. Nystagmus is not infectious or contagious.
Because nystagmus may be the first sign of a serious disorder of the eye or the brain, it is vital that when nystagmus first develops the child or adult is referred to an ophthalmologist (eye specialist) or a neurologist.
This is not known accurately, but nystagmus is believed to affect between 1 in 1,000 and 1 in 2,000 individuals.

Effects of Nystagmus

Nystagmus affects people in many ways and the effects vary from person to person. In almost all cases, vision will be impaired. Here are some of the ways the condition can affect people.
Most people who have had the condition since childhood are not affected by a constantly moving image (known as “oscillopsia”), as their brain adapts to the movement of the eyes. However, people who acquire nystagmus later in life are unlikely to adjust so well and will be affected much more by oscillopsia.
  • Nystagmus is often associated with reduced sight. The degree of sight loss varies from mild to very poor vision and can be related to an underlying condition if present. Many people with nystagmus are eligible to be registered as severely sight impaired/blind or as sight impaired/partially sighted. Being registered as severely sight impaired/blind does not necessarily mean that you are totally without sight, or will lose all your sight in the future.
  • Congenital or early onset nystagmus does not usually get worse over time. However, an underlying eye condition may deteriorate depending on what it is and how it can be treated. Sometimes treatment of the underlying condition may improve nystagmus, but usually nystagmus is permanent.
Nystagmus may cause vision to vary during the day and is likely to be affected by emotional and physical factors such as stress, tiredness, nervousness or unfamiliar surroundings. People with nystagmus may tire more easily than other people because of the extra effort involved in looking at things.
  • Many people with nystagmus can read very small print if it is close enough to their eyes. Some find a visual aid such as a magnifier helpful. However, large print material should always be made available and all written matter should be clear, especially at school. It is very difficult to share a book because it will probably be too far away or at the wrong angle.
  • People with nystagmus may read slowly because of the extra time needed to scan. This should not be taken as a sign of poor reading ability, but students or school children with nystagmus may need extra time to study and when sitting exams.
  • Many people with nystagmus use computers, as they can position screens to suit their own needs and adjust brightness, character size, and so on. However, some people find it difficult to read computer screens for more than a few minutes. Experimenting with different colour combinations and using large screens may help.
  • The angle of vision is important. Many people with the condition have a “null point” where the eye movement is reduced and the vision is improved. They will often turn their head to one side to make the best use of their vision. Sitting to one side of a screen or blackboard often helps. Children with nystagmus should be allowed to adopt the head posture which gives them best vision.
Some people with nystagmus nod their heads, probably because the head movement compensates in part for the eye movement.
  • Depth perception is usually considerably reduced. This may sometimes make people seem a little slower or clumsier than normal.
  • Balance may be affected, possibly because of poor depth perception, which may make it difficult to use stairs or cross uneven surfaces.
  • Confidence may be reduced because of poor vision and maintaining eye contact may be difficult.
  • Getting about can also be affected, especially in unfamiliar and busy surroundings such as supermarkets, railway stations and airports. Crossing roads is more difficult too. Orientation (knowing where you are) and mobility (moving from place to place safely) training can help. Very few people with nystagmus are legally able to drive a car.

Treatment

Nystagmus cannot be cured but there are several treatments which can help.
There is on-going research into nystagmus, details of which can be found on the Nystagmus Network website.
Glasses and contact lenses do not correct nystagmus although they may help a little and should certainly be worn to correct other sight problems. A child or adult may be diagnosed as being “short sighted” (blurred distance vision) or “long sighted” (problems with near to vision) as well as having nystagmus. Long or short sightedness occurs because the eye itself is not exactly the right shape for focusing.
The focusing problems can be corrected with glasses or contact lenses, but the nystagmus will still affect the person’s eyesight. Your optometrist (optician) could discuss this in more detail with you.
Very occasionally, surgery is performed to alter the position of the muscles, which move the eye. The purpose of this is to reduce the amount the head has to turn to try and see better. However surgery cannot correct or cure nystagmus.
Researchers have explored ways of trying to reduce the nystagmus by making the patient aware of the eye movement and encouraging them to control it. These techniques rely on visual and audio signals (known as biofeedback) to the patient. For example, the patient might listen to an electronic signal, which goes higher when the eye movement is greater. Some people have said that they benefit from this type of treatment. However, the evidence is not conclusive and many of questions remain unanswered such as: “Do these techniques bring about a real improvement in vision and do the possible effects last?”

The good news

Nystagmus is not painful and does not lead to progressive loss of vision. Problems resulting from congenital or early onset nystagmus tend to improve until vision stabilises around the age of five or six. Giving children plenty of stimulation in the early years does seem to help them make best use of the vision they have. Toys which encourage the child to follow a moving object, such as marbles or train sets, are helpful. So are games which are designed to develop hand-to-eye coordination.
It is not possible to say which type of school is best for the child with nystagmus – each child has their special requirements. However, most children with nystagmus go to mainstream schools. Many go on to college and most adults with nystagmus lead independent lives.

Minimising the effects of nystagmus

Much can be done to reduce the effects of nystagmus and make sure that people with the condition have the same access to the same opportunities as fully sighted people.
Accurate information and support, during the early years in particular, can and does make a big difference. In the worst cases, without a clear explanation of the effects of nystagmus, some children are mistakenly thought to have learning difficulties. This means that the real problems caused by their poor vision are not addressed. With the support of teachers trained in visual impairment, an understanding school and the help of parents, most of the difficulties presented by nystagmus can be overcome.

http://nystagmusblog.co.uk/nystagmus/

Can't Turn the Volume up Loud Enough? Use This Handy Tool


Chances are, you or someone you know will experience hearing loss at some point in life. Now that people are living longer, more are experiencing hearing loss. Many times, we are unaware we are losing our hearing. We just turn up the volume on the t.v. or radio. Many quit socializing with the people that are "too quiet". Even those with hearing aids don't socialize as much because sounds aren't "normal", or EVERYTHING is too loud, or wearing hearing aids too much each day cause recurring ear infections, or they make things louder, but not clearer, or they just aren't loud enough. They aren't perfect, they are just what they are - hearing AIDS.

If you know someone who is no longer hearing as well as they used to and have their t.v. blaring too loudly, there is an option available. All the new sets have a "closed caption" (CC) setting they can turn on. My mother only recently started using hers, wishing now she had turned it on years ago. Most programs are now privately captioned or captioned by the National Captioning Institute. When breaking news comes up live, we are now able to read what the newscaster is saying. It's wonderful.

I am fortunate to have been learning Sign Language through the years, but there are so many people who are in a place where they haven't learned any Sign Language. Yet, they can't hear as they used to. They isolate themselves because they don't fit into any "social category", such as "Hearing" or "Deaf". They are wedged between 2 segments of society, not being able to hear, yet not being able to sign. They are some of the loneliest people in our society. 

I have been in meetings where we had "real time" captioning available along with ASL interpreters. Many who are deafened later in life never learned Sign Language. It is much harder to learn as you get older. For these people, many who are now the generation known as Baby Boomers, closed captioning is a wonderful option to have available. 

This is Meaghan from Gilbert High School and her wonderful interpretation

I don't know who this young woman is, I only know she is a high school student at Gilbert High School and her name is Meaghan. I think she has a wonderful future ahead of her in the performing arts and ASL, don't you? The lyrics can be found below the video.





Something you should know about My Heart Will Go On Lyrics

Title: Celine Dion - My Heart Will Go On lyrics
Artist: Celine Dion Lyrics
Visitors: 5713 visitors have clicked My Heart Will Go On Lyrics since November 23, 2011.
Search: 11 visitors have searched My Heart Will Go On Lyrics using the site search engine since November 23, 2011.





Writer: HORNER/JENNINGS 

Every night in my dreams
I see you, I feel you
That is how I know you, go on

Far across the distance
And spaces between us
You have come to show you, go on

Near, far, wherever you are
I believe that the heart does go on
Once more you open the door
And you're here in my heart
And my heart will go on and on

Love can touch us one time
And last for a lifetime
And never let go till we're gone

Love was when I loved you
One true time I hold you
In my life we'll always go on

Near, far, wherever you are
I believe that the heart does go on
Once more you open the door
And you're here in my heart
And my heart will go on and on

You're here, there's nothing I fear
And I know that my heart will go on
We'll stay forever this way
You are safe in my heart
And my heart will go on and on
http://www.lyrics007.com/Celine%20Dion%20Lyrics/My%20Heart%20Will%20Go%20On%20Lyrics.html

Monday, November 28, 2011

"Hi, Friend, Play?"

I've often heard the sentiment that music is the universal language. I've also heard that love is the universal language.  Language is a funny thing because even within each culture, we have many different dialects. Language can divide us, or bring us together. Communication is at the very core of each and every one of us as people. God designed us to be communicators, to be companions with Him and with each other.

I love watching young children discovering that everything has a word associated with it. You can see the excitement on their faces when they figure that out, and more so when they know that you understand exactly what they are talking about. It begins naturally with pointing to the object and gurgling. Mom or dad are usually quick to pick up on this and put a word to the object. Once the child figures out the sound mom and dad make each time they point to the object, they learn to associate the word they hear with that object.

It is the same with signing. The wonderful thing about signing is that children can do it more easily at an early age before they can speak. It only takes a few tries and they have the hang of it. Research is now showing us that children who learn to sign early in life learn to read sooner and develop verbal language skills more quickly than children who don't.

Many daycare centers and preschools have discovered that children who learn American Sign Language (ASL) together communicate more easily with one another. There are fewer tantrums, fewer miscommunications and more good manners between the children. They are not struggling to understand what each other is saying. They are all "speaking" the same language together, and they are getting along together better.

There is a wonderful program designed by Two Little Hands Production called "Signing Time". If you aren't familiar with it, check it out. They are on PBS early in the mornings. That was where I first discovered them when my son came along. Most libraries carry the series if you can't find it in your local tv listing.

Signing Time not only comes with English spoken and written, it also now comes with spoken and written Spanish, though the signs are still the same. The exciting thing about this program is that it is being taught to children around the world. Children in Japan, South America and other places are learning ASL through the Signing Time series, DVDs or Signing Time Academy instructors.

This presents an interesting question. Will there someday be a universal language? Could American Sign Language be the very language that breaks the communication barrier between the rest of the world? Could the children learning ASL today be the generation to even make that possible? American Sign Language is a recognized language. Many students now need a second language in order to graduate. ASL is accepted and credited to meet that requirement.

Today, children learning ASL in preschool and early elementary school may well find themselves in a sandbox at a park on the other side of the world with another child who has learned ASL. Just three little words are all they need to know to start a friendship. "Hi, Friend. Play?"

This is "Indescribable"

I love the passion expressed through this woman's artful interpretation of "Indescribable". She goes by the name "handsvoiceactivated" on YouTube. This is beautiful and uplifting. The lyrics are below, though she takes artistic license and adds meaning through the signs. I love what she did with the stanza about spring, and the stars and their names and about the heart and being loved despite what is in our hearts. Lovely.



"Indescribable" by Chris Tomlin..lyrics below

"Indescribable"

From the highest of heights to the depths of the sea
Creation's revealing Your majesty
From the colors of fall to the fragrance of spring
Every creature unique in the song that it sings
All exclaiming

Indescribable, uncontainable,
You placed the stars in the sky and You know them by name.
You are amazing God
All powerful, untameable,
Awestruck we fall to our knees as we humbly proclaim
You are amazing God

Who has told every lightning bolt where it should go
Or seen heavenly storehouses laden with snow
Who imagined the sun and gives source to its light
Yet conceals it to bring us the coolness of night
None can fathom

Indescribable, uncontainable,
You placed the stars in the sky and You know them by name
You are amazing God
All powerful, untameable,
Awestruck we fall to our knees as we humbly proclaim
You are amazing God
You are amazing God

Indescribable, uncontainable,
You placed the stars in the sky and You know them by name.
You are amazing God
All powerful, untameable,
Awestruck we fall to our knees as we humbly proclaim
You are amazing God
Indescribable, uncontainable,
You placed the stars in the sky and You know them by name.
You are amazing God
Incomparable, unchangeable
You see the depths of my heart and You love me the same
You are amazing God
You are amazing God


http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/christomlin/indescribable.html

Sunday, November 27, 2011

Destino

This is something a little different. This 6 minute film was created in 1945 by Walt Disney and Salvador Dali. It is visual, no talking, however, Fabulous Husband just informed me they are "singing in a foreign language. Opera. 'Destino'." No matter, the visuals are stunning and no words are necessary.  I wonder what they could have created together with today's technology?




Saturday, November 26, 2011

"My Song" What it is like to be deaf or hearing impaired (an accurate depiction)

This film is 25 minutes in length. If you know someone who is deaf or hearing impaired, I suggest you find time to view this film. It also depicts how deafness affects the family. Well done, deep and touching film.


Wednesday, November 23, 2011

A Couple of Thanksgiving Signs from Rachel Coleman at Signing Time

To ALL of you who take the time to visit and read the posts here, Thank YOU. For my American readers, "Happy Thanksgiving".

Normal Does Not = Right

This is parent/teacher conference week at my son's school. Fabulous Husband and I had an interesting meeting with the teacher, the assistant teacher and the principal yesterday. The principal sat in not as a principal, primarily, but because she specializes in special needs.

The funny thing about this, I have more "special needs" than our son, and also, because of my "special needs", my son has a couple of behavioral issues going on. His teacher told us:

1. He's so LOUD.

2. He gets into people's personal space.

Yes, he is loud. I have inadvertently taught him to be loud over the course of his seven years of life. Even before I found out my hearing loss had reached the degree of "deaf" I had been telling him to speak up. Every day. All day.

I have a vision impairment, as well, nystagmus, which makes lip reading a bit difficult if you're not right in front of me. Nystagmus is when your eyes quickly move back and forth, like a tic or muscle spasm. I'm not sure if it is a muscle or neurological disorder. I only know that it interferes with reading lips. As a result, I have taught him that it's appropriate to get right in front of me so I can "see" what he is saying. Hence, he has been trained it is ok to get into the personal space of others, face to face, up close and personal.

I have a sneaky suspicion I may unconsciously do these very things myself. So, if we happen to meet in the future, and I seem to be closing in on your personal space, it is because I can't hear you and I want to "see" what you have to say. There's nothing weird about that.

Some deaf people don't hear themselves, depending on the degree of their deafness. Others may think they have a speech impediment or an accent or have been tipping the bottle and their words are slurred. That is not the case. Think about it. If you had never heard people talking, you either would not speak at all, or you would not know what sounds are coming out of your mouth. It is by speech therapy and training that many of them can even accomplish to speak as well as they do, and it's not something most Deaf can do, especially if they did not have the training and help available to them, which is often the case.

As I have become deaf through the passing years, my own voice often gets louder to compensate. I often have to tell people I have no volume control and I may need a little help. Sometimes, I sense my voice has taken on a monotone quality. Sometimes, it just doesn't feel "right" and in that case, I appreciate when someone lets me know I'm getting a little loud because that helps me learn to be conscious of how I form my words and to put effort into my speech.

Sometimes, a child may exhibit traits that can be misinterpreted as having special needs or a medical problem when in fact, it may be the result of environmental issues. Just because something may not seem "normal" to you, does not mean anything is "wrong".  It may be perfectly normal for that child's family. In which case, it may just be a matter of teaching there are other socially appropriate ways of behaving.

Here's How You Can Stop Telemarketers from Calling You (in Pennsylvania)

The bad news is: telemarketers can now call cell phones. There is good news, however. If you don't wish to receive calls, etc. from telemarketers, you can opt out - online! There is a link where you can verify your phone number by email. This is great news for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing.

This website is set up by the Pennsylvania Office of Attorney General. By signing up, you are registering to opt out of telemarketing phone calls for 5 years. Be sure to read more about it on the main page before filling out the email form.

Whether you are hearing, Deaf or Hard of Hearing, be sure to sign up if you wish to end telemarketer calls to ANY of your phones. My husband who works for the Office of Attorney General here in PA and I both opted out.  I also want to give a shout out to the Pennsylvania Office of Attorney General and their IT department for setting this up.

Main page with information and phone number for "hearing" people who wish to call in to opt out:  http://attorneygeneral.gov/dnc.aspx

Link for the verification via email form:  http://dnc.attorneygeneral.gov/Register.aspx

Don't delay - register today!

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

FaceBook and Google are doing it wrong

I have lost my first original FaceBook page simply because I would not provide a phone number. Now Google is badgering me for a phone number when I log into my blogspot page. I wonder how many Deaf and Hard of Hearing people don't have a phone, or if they do, do not relinquish the number.

I have run into this problem with companies time and again. They refuse to provide an email for contact and yet, if you call them through the relay they hang up on you. Or, they leave countless voicemails that just sit in your box unheard, unanswered. I wish someone who knew the heads of these companies would explain they are being discriminatingly inaccessible for a growing population. The frustrating thing about this is how more companies are doing this. I just got badgered by Google. How long will I have my blogspot before they, too, delete me for not providing a phone number?

How have you handled this? Have you lost any accounts for not providing a phone number yet? What can we do to get the attention of these companies so we can offer them other options for those who are Deaf and Hearing Impaired?

Monday, November 21, 2011

There Is No right or Wrong Way to Get Support You Need by Liz Fisher

Today's post is written for us by my friend Liz Fisher. She graciously accepted my invitation to write a guest post. Though we're literally an ocean apart, hearing loss knows no boundaries, nor the issues that come with it. Support is hugely important. You'll find the link to Liz's Deaf Blog below the article.


There is no right or wrong way to get support you need



How you get support as a late deafened adult is up to you. There is no right or wrong way going about it.

Here in the UK, when you are first told you are deaf, there is no counselling support offered there and then should that person need it. You just go away with your hearing aids after being fitted and shown how to use them.
Then you come after so long for a review, so they can see how you got on with them, and if they have helped. If nothing more is needed to be done, then you go back away again, and the only time you need to come back is for maintenance, or if you have any problems.
I felt later in the year that I needed support, or some kind of counselling. But I did not know where to turn. So I kept my feelings hidden until I decided to write my personal blog; Liz's Deaf Blog. My blog was my therapy, which I never realised would one day help others when I first started writing this.  
A few  years down the line, when I was claiming for DLA (Disability Living Allowance), all my feelings, and more, surfaced up again. With other problems going on in my life, also, I felt like it was one vicious circle.
I then approached my GP with these problems, thinking I would not get support for my hearing loss issues, and found that there was support out there. And that I could talk to a counsellor about what I was feeling with regards to my hearing loss, along with my other issues. 
So my advice is, don't wait like I did, until you feel like it's spiralling out of control. If you feel you need counselling, then go to your GP and ask for counselling
Find  your own group, as sharing your problems regarding deaf issues you face with others who understand will be of great help, like joining hard of hearing groups in your area. You will make friends along the way. .  


You don't have to start a blog like I did. But if you feel like writing about it, and sharing it to the world, and chatting on other blogs as well, you can get support and make friends that way, too. I have made some great friends along the way through blogging.
*Be sure to visit Liz'z Deaf Blog :   http://lizsdeafblog.blogspot.com/

Thursday, November 17, 2011

Voice Mail Falls on Deaf Ears

IPhones are one of my favorite inventions. However, not for the reason so many people think it is. Hearing people often don't realize that cell phones were a luxury that Deaf and Hard of Hearing people never experienced..until the IPhone came along. What is wonderful about this particular phone is the App for the Hamilton Relay.

I don't hear, so I miss incoming calls, and people forget and often leave voice messages. That's why my number is unlisted and if someone needs to reach me, they text me, then I call the Relay Agent who calls the person for me and types to me what they are saying. Very few people who know me have my private number.

This week, however, I had four voice mail messages. I figured they weren't important, because those who know me, know to text me, or to call Fabulous Husband.

I finally just had Fabulous Husband check them out. They were wrong numbers, and one was a mumbler even he couldn't hear or understand. We figure that was a wrong number as well.

It was suggested I create an outgoing message that simply tells callers to text me. The only problem with that, I may end up with telemarketers clogging my day with unwanted texts. Although, the nice thing about being married to someone who works for the Office of Attorney General is that if we do get telemarketers, they don't call back once they are told we've opted out and they reached someone who can do something about the solicitous calls.

I like the idea of having an outgoing message, something fun and clever. I just haven't figured out what it should be. Perhaps "Your message is about to fall on deaf ears"? Have you a fun, witty, polite suggestion I could use? I'd love to see your suggestion, leave it in the comment box below.

Wednesday, November 16, 2011

"Dog Days Are Over" by Florence and the Machine : an ASL video

This ASL music video was filmed by Ali Rayburn. I thought it fitting for this time of year in our neck of the woods, Pennsylvania. "Dog Days" of summer certainly are over. :-)  Something a little fun to start the day.  (see note at the bottom)



Not quite what you were expecting? I thought this was visually beautiful. This was signed by Kitty Winans
Happiness, hit her like a train on a track
Coming towards her, stuck still no turning back
She hid around corners and she hid under beds
She killed it with kisses and from it she fled
With every bubble she sank with a drink
And washed it away down the kitchen sink

The dog days are over
The dog days are done
The horses are coming
So you better run

Run fast for your mother run fast for your father
Run for your children for your sisters and brothers
Leave all your love and your longing behind you
Can't carry it with you if you want to survive

The dog days are over
The dog days are done
Can you hear the horses
'Cause here they come
[ Lyrics from: http://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/f/florence_and_the_machine/dog_days_are_over.html ]
And I never wanted anything from you
Except everything you had
And what was left after that too. oh.

Happiness hit her like a bullet in the back
Struck from a great height
By someone who should know better than that

The dog days are over
The dog days are gone
Can you hear the horses
'Cause here they come

Run fast for your mother and fast for your father
Run for your children for your sisters and brothers
Leave all your love and your longing behind you
Can't carry it with you if you want to survive

The dog days are over
The dog days are gone
Can you hear the horses
Because here they come

The dog days are over
The dog days are gone
Can you hear the horses
Because here they come

More lyrics: http://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/f/florence_and_the_machine/#share

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

DeafTV: Officers Learning Deaf Culture at MDT

Thank you, Ericka Wiggins for sharing this video. There are other responders on the West Coast in the San Francisco area looking for someone to help caption their training videos as well. Contact me if you would like to volunteer.

http://www.deaftv.com/film/officers-learning-deaf-culture-at-msd/

I just love how the Deaf Community reaches out to help and train others.

Monday, November 14, 2011

"A Survival Guide for New Deafies!" by Amy Sargent.

I loved this book. Whether you are new to deafness and hearing loss, or not, there are things a person can learn through this book and the perspectives of deafness Amy shares. There are excellent tips for friends and relatives to learn as well. Even if you aren't deaf or losing your hearing, this is a wonderful, delightful book to read. Amy's life lessons and journey to deafness are sad, funny and enlightening. I recommend this book to EVERYONE.

This is my original tweet to Amy after I had started reading her book, "A Survival Guide for New Deafies!"
"@DeafGirlAmy LOVE your book!! I wish it was available when I started going deaf in my 20's and 30's. My progression was slower than yours. Had your book been available then, I would have adapted so much better with the onset deafness and not have isolated myself ~ @XpressiveHandz"

You can find excerpts from Amy's book on her website here:

http://deafgirlamy.com/

Be sure to order a copy for yourself while you're there, or for someone you love who is dealing with hearing loss.