"Each friend represents a world in us, a world possibly not born until they arrive." Anaïs Nin

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Monday, May 11, 2015

Princess Ewauna and the Legend of Face Rock (photo by Gary Edmiston)

I love living in the small coastal community of Bandon. My Fabulous Husband was up very early one morning to catch the moon over Face Rock before it dipped into the sea. I love how he also caught the reflection of the moon along the shoreline. Below the photo is the Legend of Face Rock, as found on the Coastal Muse page.

Face Rock, Bandon, Oregon Photo by Gary Edmiston

"The Legend of Face Rock"

Many, many years ago, the legend begins from the Nah-So-Mah tribe. Chief Siskiyou, from the far mountains, traveled with his family and clansmen to the coast to trade with the four tribes who lived by the great sea they called Wecoma.

In his honor, the four chiefs planned the greatest potlatch in all memory. They roasted bear, salmon, elk and deer. Huge quantities of clams and mussels were steamed. Cedar bark trays were filled with honey and red and blue huckleberries.
The local tribes were all in great fear of Seatka, the evil spirit who lived in the sea. It was feared that Seatka might cause trouble for the people and their guest. Armed warriors stood guard on the bluff. However Princess Ewauna, the beautiful daughter of Chief Siskiyou, and those in her tribe who lived in the mountains were not afraid.

Ewauna was enchanted by the sea. After the feast when people were sleeping, she slipped away from camp, carrying a basket with her cat and kittens nestled inside, followed by her faithful dog, Komax. She wandered down to the ocean where she danced and played with delight. 

The moon was full and Wecoma ran silver. Ewauna, who did not fear Seatka, swam in the sea, farther and farther from shore. Komax barked a warning but it was too late. The evil Seatka had captured the beautiful princess. The dog, carrying the basket of kittens, swam to his mistress and buried his teeth in the hand of Seatka. Howling, he shook off the dog and threw the cats into the sea. Seatka tried to make Ewauna look into his eyes, but she refused to look away from the great round moon.

When her father awoke, he raised the alarm. Everyone rushed to the shore of Wecoma. There they saw the lovely face of Ewauna gazing skyward. Her dog was on the beach howling for the princess and the cat and kittens were in the sea to the west. In time, they all turned to stone, frozen forever as they were that long ago dawn.


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